My Profile   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
WIPP In Action
Blog Home All Blogs
Our organizational blog featuring the most important news in WIPP advocacy for women-owned businesses; federal procurement education, programs, and opportunities; and signature events celebrating and engaging with this powerful community.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Advocacy  membership  leadership  spotlight  federal contracting  President's Message  SBA  COVID-19  legislation  regulatory  cybersecurity  Federal Procurement  Federal Procurement Opportunities  guest post  Action Alert  Congress  FAR  policy  resource  Senate Small Business  Access to Capital  Appropriations  budget  community  microloan  partner  WIPP Works In Washington  women-owned  Access  ChallengeHER 

Advocacy Update: WOSB Final Rule Highlights

Posted By Ann Sullivan, WIPP Chief Advocate, Wednesday, May 20, 2020

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has published its final rule for the Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB) and Economically Disadvantaged Women-Owned Small Business (EDWOSB) certification. 
AnnSullivan
The impetus for this rule is the FY2015 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which directed the SBA to create its own WOSB/EDWOSB certification. At the same time, the Congress authorized the sole source authority for the WOSB/EDWOSB program. WIPP has worked with SBA throughout this process, submitting comments with input from our members. We are thrilled to see that issues we raised were included in the final rule, such as

  •  excluding retirement accounts from net worth;
  •  harmonizing the economic disadvantage qualification across socio-economic contracting programs; and
  • continuing to allow third-party certifiers. 

The benefits of this implementation include simplifying the process for contracting officers to use the program and can rely on SBA certification with confidence. This update will require no additional document review, will replace the WOSB Repository, and will reduce amount of time to complete a certification. 

 

Definition of WOSB: At least 51% owned and controlled by one or more women who are United States citizens. 

Website: certify.SBA.gov 

Effective dates: Rule goes into effect on July 15, 2020. SBA will begin processing certifications on October 15, 2020. 

Highlights:

  1. Retirement accounts will now be excluded from calculations of an economically disadvantaged individual's net worth, irrespective of the individual's age.
  2. Makes 8(a) qualifications for economic disadvantage the same as EDWOSB program. Qualifications include: (a) net worth cannot exceed $750,000; (b) adjusted gross income averaged over the three preceding years cannot exceed $350,000; (c) An individual will generally not be considered economically disadvantaged if the fair market value of all her assets (including her primary residence and the value of the applicant/participant firm) exceeds $6 million and (d) retirement funds are now excluded from net worth calculation.
  3. Only SBA certified WOSBs can use the WOSB set-aside/sole program, but agencies can count  contracts to women outside the program that are only self-certified toward their WOSB goal.
  4. Third-party certifications are accepted as are those certified by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs CVE, and 8(a) certifications. 8(a) certified are automatically considered to qualify as EDWOSBs. DBE certifications are not accepted.
  5. A business performing on a long-term WOSB or EDWOSB contract (i.e., one in excess of five years) must represent that it is a certified WOSB or EDWOSB in order for the award to continue to count towards an agency's WOSB goal. For new WOSB and EDWOSB set-aside contracts, a business must be able to demonstrate that it has applied for certification before the date it submitted a bid, and that it has not previously sought and been denied certification. For new WOSB or EDWOSB sole-source contracts, a business must already be certified at the time it seeks to obtain the sole-source contract.
  6. Applications will be processed within 90 days. If denied, an applicant can reapply for certification after 90 days.
  7. Requires annual certification affidavit and recertification every three years.
  8. SBA will give priority to a firm who has been awarded a contract under the program but the application is still pending before the SBA. Determination will be within 15 days.

Tags:  Advocacy  regulatory  SBA  WOSB 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Your Certification Is a License to Hunt

Posted By Nancy Aber Goshow, Founding WIPP Member, Monday, May 18, 2020


As someone who has been in business for more than 40 years, I tell all business owners who become certified, especially as a WOSB, EDWOSB, and/or DBE to develop a sound marketing strategy to leverage their certification.

Nancy Aber Goshow

 

One of the best strategies is summarized with a five-letter acronym: DFRPC

  • D - Differentiate: Identify strengths that differentiate your firm from all other women-owned businesses;
  • F - Focus your efforts on promoting those strengths;
  • R - Relationships: Build relationships with your target agencies that seek your strengths;
  • P - Past Performance: Build a robust portfolio of exceptional past performance and references; and 
  • C - Know your Customer: Research each target agency.
  • Research each target agency by answering these questions: Who, What, How, When, Where, and Why?
    • Who buys the services you perform?
    • How do they procure those services?
    • When do they procure those services?
    • Where are those services delivered?
    • How are you prepared to deliver those services?
    • Why would they buy those services from you?

Finally, adhere to the “Rule of Three” to build relationships with your target agencies:

  • Develop a three-year hunting marketing strategy;
  • Select three federal agencies to target;
  • Go to each target agency’s industry day and events where those three agencies present their opportunities;
  • Get their cards, don’t push your cards;
  • Find out the best way to follow-up with each contact;
  • Follow up every three weeks for three years as long as it takes to be known by those agencies; and
  • Show up, show up, show up over three years and on into the future.
Keep in mind during this process that federal government procurement is a long-term effort, it took me five years to get my first opportunity to compete and seven years before I won a federal contract.


About the Author:
Nancy Aber Goshow leads Goshow Architects and is a Founding WIPP Member. Read more about Nancy’s business and her commitment to WIPP in the May 2020 Member Spotlight
 
Each Monday, WIPP aims to feature a guest blog post from a member on tips and tools for business success. To submit a blog post, email the WIPP ACE HelpDesk at membership@wipp.org

 

 

Tags:  guest post  membership 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

President's Message - Robust Grant Programs Needed In Next Wave of Relief

Posted By Candace Waterman, WIPP President & CEO, Wednesday, May 6, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, May 5, 2020

This week I am celebrating my second anniversary leading WIPP, and this year also marks 15 years working to elevate women-owned businesses at the regional and national levels. During this celebratory time, we are also in the midst of a crisis that has already left an indelible impression not only because of how much it changed our lives, but also for how quickly this community has come together like never before. I have never been more proud to stand together with our partner organizations, corporate partners, and especially our stalwart members who continue to define the calm in the storm. 
Candace Waterman
I do not need to tell you that this pandemic has taken an enormous toll on women-owned businesses. Our recent impact survey showed more than 71% of the respondents reported a decrease in business. Approximately 73% of our survey participants had applied for federal funding, the majority listing either the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) or Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) programs. On a more positive note, 89% of respondents have been able to continue operations during this pandemic as of April 15.

Another survey-based study, "Women-Owned Businesses & PPP Survey Results," found that “women-owned businesses asked for and received less money than national averages” in the first round of PPP funding. In addition, “women relied heavily on large national banks and, when they did, their likelihood of obtaining a PPP loan plummeted.” We are watching the progress of second-round funding through the PPP and EIDL and will keep you updated.  

In the coming weeks, more relief is expected. Given the urgency of capital, we are asking Congress to consider revamping the programs to separate them into loans and grants rather than a combination of the two. While small businesses will need loans with generous terms in the recovery stage of this pandemic, they need grants now. 

Joining your voice with WIPP is necessary to make an impact on Capitol Hill. Contact your Representative and Senators today and share our letter urging small business grants rather than forgivable loans. If you have questions, please contact the WIPP ACE HelpDesk at membership@wipp.org

 

 

Tags:  Advocacy  leadership  President's Message 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIPP Works In Washington: What's Next?

Posted By Ann Sullivan, WIPP Chief Advocate, Wednesday, May 6, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, May 5, 2020
COVID-19 relief took the form of four bills passed by Congress in the last two months. All of this is centered around relief for workers and employers hit by COVID-19, including small business loan and forgiveness programs, aid to hospitals and money for test deployment, employer required sick leave, and direct payments to Americans. 
AnnSullivan
A staggering $2 trillion was spent in these four bills and the Federal Reserve Bank spent an estimated additional $4 trillion on relief. We learned the demand from small businesses for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and the Economic Injury Disaster loans (EIDL) far exceeded available funding. Everyone is curious about the direction of future aid for obvious reasons. What’s going to be in the next bill or is there going to be a next bill? 

My best guess is that the next Congressional bill will be a hybrid of relief and recovery. Much is left to do on the relief side and refinement of the programs put in place by previous legislation. When programs are drafted in a hurry, unexpected issues arise that need to be addressed. Evidence is the number of guidance documents issued by the Small Business Administration (SBA), the Department of Treasury, and the IRS surrounding small business loan programs. For federal contractors, implementation of Section 3610 relief has generated extensive documentation. The next bill will most certainly contain changes to existing programs.

Is Congress going to deliver additional relief by providing additional funding for the PPP or EIDL programs? Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) suggested that Congress may slow down future relief, saying "until we can begin to open up the economy, we can’t spend enough money to solve the problem." Relief to state and localities has yet to materialize but is widely considered to be a major part of any future bill.

As governors start loosening restrictions on stay-at-home orders and industry starts to slowly reopen, the focus is slowly shifting toward economic recovery. Congressional leaders are looking at successful programs deployed during the Great Recession (2007-2009) that could be helpful during this pandemic. Another much talked about idea is a stimulus, such as a massive infrastructure program. This would not only cover shovel ready construction projects, but also broadband, telecommunications and technology infrastructure. 

Also bubbling up are tax deductions and credits for businesses who will need relief for many months to come. Businesses are asking for special liability restrictions due to COVID-19 in order to feel comfortable bringing employees back to work and opening their doors to consumers. The Senate has signaled this as a priority, but their House counterparts are not so sure. 

Lastly, the federal marketplace offers a tremendous opportunity for small business recovery, but the rules need to change to allow more dollars to flow to these businesses.

The “What’s Next” list is overwhelming because the need is so great. Our advocacy team is dedicated to ensuring women business owners have a voice in all of these deliberations. That’s the mission of WIPP – we intend on keeping it that way.

Tags:  Advocacy  COVID-19  legislation 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Federal Contracting: Opportunities In the Face of Challenge

Posted By Elizabeth Sullivan, WIPP Advocacy Team, Tuesday, May 5, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, May 20, 2020

While many segments of the economy are experiencing unprecedented loss, one sector of the economy, the federal government, is rapidly increasing its spending to combat the COVID-19 virus. Reported spending obligations for COVID-19 as of May 18 are about $11.6 billion and are expected to increase in the coming weeks. (Note: every time the numbers are updated, the previous link will reflect those updates.) Here are a few of the numbers you should be aware of as a federal contractor.

Elizabeth Sullivan Agencies flowing the most dollars to small businesses are the Departments of Veterans Affairs (VA), Small Business Administration (SBA), Health and Human Services (HHS), Homeland Security (DHS) and Agriculture (USDA). Veterans Affairs has awarded over $624 million, while SBA has the second highest dollars to small businesses with $573 million. Of the total dollars spent by the Department of Homeland Security so far on coronavirus, about 20% was awarded to small businesses. That is a little over $317 million of the total $1.6 billion spent as of May 18, 2020. 

Dollars are also being awarded to women-owned small businesses (WOSBs). Across all agencies, since March, over $735 million has been awarded to WOSBs to assist with COVID-19 relief. Just for some context – this number has exceeded the total dollars awarded for WOSBs in FY2018, which was $473.1 million. So, in a matter of months, the dollars awarded have exceeded an entire fiscal year’s previous spend. This increase has been across small business programs – service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses (SDVOSBs) also have been awarded $578 million and HUBZone companies $161 million. 

A few examples of how and what federal agencies are pursuing in terms of COVID-19 assistance include HHS refocusing its research contracts to seek assistance with COVID-19 and the Army seeking new technology to help prevent, treat and manage the coronavirus. The SBA is on a hiring spree given their new responsibility to process $620 billion in loans to small businesses.

So, how can you take advantage of this new spending? In addition to working with  your existing federal customers, there are two other ways to showcase your capabilities to assist with COVID-19.

  1. Sign up on the Disaster Response Registry in SAM, where you can submit your COVID-19 related capability statements and product offerings. This registry is used agency-wide.
  2. Submit inquiries to the DHS Procurement Action Innovative Response (PAIR) Team. DHS created this in response to the surge of incoming industry offers of help and innovative ideas to support the fight against COVID-19. 

By the time you read this, more dollars will have been spent. Make sure you are taking advantage of these opportunities now. 

 

 

Tags:  Federal Procurement Opportunities 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WIPP Member Spotlight - Nancy Aber Goshow

Posted By Laura Berry, Friday, May 1, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Nancy Aber Goshow
Nancy Aber Goshow Partner
Goshow Architects
WIPP Member Since 2003

 

Join us for the May Community Connection webinar on May 20 at 2 PM ET to hear Nancy’s discussion with WIPP President & CEO Candace Waterman.

Mission and Vision:

 

Goshow Architects is one of the largest woman-owned architectural firms in New York City. We design healthy, sustainable energy efficient buildings and spaces for the public good and positive social impact for communities and individuals. Our mission is to create architecture that inspires people, collaboration, sustainability and innovation by building for the public good and designing for the future.

Goshow Architects has four specialty design teams: 
education, infrastructure, housing, and transportation. 

  • High schools, community colleges, universities;
  • Water supply and wastewater treatment facilities;
  • Market rate and supportive housing;
  • Ferry and rail terminals.

You are based in New York City. Tell us about how you’re handling the novel coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic. 

Right now, our education and housing projects are on temporary pause, 77% of our revenue sources are shut down, 60% of our active projects paused. 

Thankfully our infrastructure and transportation projects are increasing in number and moving forward. We are architectural design subconsultants to six large international engineering firms and two large transportation engineering firms, so these second-tier opportunities will keep us busy until our prime contract projects start up again. 

The US Postal Service has stopped delivering mail to our entire midtown Manhattan office building. As a business that depends on payment checks sent through the US mail, my once a week visit to the post office has become a nightmare. I can only go once a week, between 1 and 3 p.m. I stand in line with 40 others, for 45 minutes to request our office mail for the past 7 days, then I wait again for another 30 minutes while our mail is retrieved from a remote storage room in the building. The air conditioning is not on, so everyone is masked and sweating. The post office and my office is only a 3-mile round trip walk from my home. I walk to my office twice a week. Taking a taxi, a bus or the NYC subway is not an option I would consider.

Our design work has continued without interruption because we are very experienced and efficient working remotely. Our design work is produced by cloud-based collaborative software, and it’s more efficient for our clients. Having an office in New York City has forced us to develop remote working solutions to get us through prior events like Superstorm Sandy, extended snow days, and subway strikes. But those events only lasted a little more than a week.

Working remotely is not a challenge for our staff. It’s the duration of the New York City pause and the physical separation of our collaborative teams that is beginning to wear on all of us. We miss working with each other on a daily basis. We hold weekly All Company Team, (ACT) Meetings on Zoom. Seeing each other helps to fill the person-to-person interaction we miss most in our collaborative design process. We are also holding Zoom cocktail parties as another way to connect our staff.

 

Goshow Architects is celebrating 40 years of business. WIPP will be celebrating 20 years next May. What led you to join WIPP in 2003?

I met WIPP co-founders Barbara Kasoff and Dr. Terry Neese while we were trying to move the Women's Equity Contracting Act forward in the early 2000s. I am a successful WBE and DBE government contractor for New York State and New York City and joined WIPP to learn about how to qualify, find, and win federal government contracts as a woman-owned business. At that time, WOSB firms were winning less than 3% of the federal spend [of the 5% goal]. 

 

Can you tell us any stories about what it was like to be part of the founding membership at WIPP?


It was very exciting and thrilling to walk into congressional hearings to give relevant testimony and actively participate in federal policy hearings. It was even more exciting and thrilling to see legislative outcomes we initiated and language we contributed.


Early on, I testified to a Congressional committee on size standards for federal contracting, which at the time had not been changed since 1976. I went to Capitol Hill and the American Institute of Architecture (AIA) was against changing the standards because, of course, there were other firms that stood to profit from keeping the standards the same. We ended up moving the standards for architecture from 3.5 million to 7.5 million. 


I also love that WIPP is truly nonpartisan. In 2008, we sent WIPP delegations to the Democratic and Republican party conventions. I remember attending a convention with WIPP Chief Advocate Ann Sullivan as well as Barbara Kasoff and Mary Schnack, who have both since passed away. We were all watching the live broadcast of Chris Matthews. All of a sudden, there he was with a microphone in my face asking me what I thought about Sarah Palin. Thankfully, I had been taught by Mary how to do a PR interview pivot, and I answered that “At Women Impacting Public Policy Public we are nonpartisan. Anytime a woman is running for office, that’s a good thing.”

 

As a long-time WIPP member, what is your favorite part of being involved in the network?


Working with other like-minded business owners in the ongoing fight for increased procurement opportunities for women-owned businesses. After 12 years of pushing the federal government to promulgate the rules for the WOSB/EDWOSB program in the SBA, we finally achieved our goal. I am a proponent of the program; however the EDWOSB designation has not helped me to win any contracts. We still have a long way to go to get our fair share of the federal spend. 

Through WIPP, I also learned all about how to receive an 8a designation. I won two 5-year IDIQ Contracts with the GSA and USACE as an 8a architecture firm. I ended up presenting for the ChallengeHER program, helping other women-owned businesses learn from our challenges.

 

What advice would you give to a new member looking to be engaged in the WIPP network?

Particularly for federal and state contractors, join at a WIPP level that offers you opportunities to join the Procurement Committee. Attend various industry day events at agencies and represent WIPP at those industry days.

As someone who has been in business as long as I have, I tell all businesses who become certified as a WOSB, EDWOSB, DBE to develop a sound marketing strategy to leverage their certification.


Any other advice for women-owned businesses in the current challenging climate?

This too shall pass. This is the worst we’ve been through, but in the 40 years we’ve had the firm, we’ve survived more than seven downturns. The bad part is we’re on the downturn. But the good part is that when the upturn kicks in, profitability will run ahead of expenses. Once expenses start to increase and catch up, profitability will be more difficult to maintain. So we all need to be ready to take the best advantage of the economic growth that will come after the pandemic is over.

 



Goshow Architects

Learn more about Nancy and her team at Goshow Architects at https://www.goshow.com.

 

Each month, WIPP highlights a member who has leveraged WIPP membership to grow their business, engage with elected officials, and/or elevate the mission of WIPP and the visibility of women-owned businesses.

 


Tags:  leadership  membership  spotlight 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Advocacy Update: Class Deviation Provides Stability for Federal Contractors

Posted By Elizabeth Sullivan, WIPP Advocacy Team, Wednesday, April 15, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, April 14, 2020

 

Small business contractors rely on a consistent flow of income to be able to continue to serve their federal customers. This has been an issue since a directive encouraging a goal of 15 days for prompt payment of small business contractors expired in 2017. WIPP successfully advocated for a reinstatement of prompt payment to small federal contractors in the FY2020 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). This section that is now law, establishes a goal of 15 days for federal agencies to pay small business contractors upon receipt of proper invoice, and implements the same goal for prime contractors to pay small business subcontractors.

 

Last week, the Civilian Agency Acquisition Council (CAAC) issued a class deviation (effective date April 6), implementing this section of the law. WIPP is thrilled that this development will help provide stability for companies during this time and in the future.

 

 

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink
 

WIPP Member Spotlight - Michelle Kantor

Posted By Laura Berry, Wednesday, April 1, 2020
Updated: Thursday, April 2, 2020
Michelle Kantor

 

Michelle Kantor

Member, McDonald Hopkins

 

WIPP Member Since 2013

 

 


What led you to join WIPP?

 

The majority of my clients over the past 30 years have been women-owned businesses. I have a passion to help them succeed and grow. WIPP is, by far, the premiere national advocate of women-owned businesses. I am a member of the board of directors of the Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC), a regional partner of the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) as well as general counsel to the Federation of Women Contractors in Chicago (FWC)WIPP has immensely helped both the WBDC and FWC with keeping apprised of federal laws and regulations that can impact women-owned businesses. 


As a WIPP member, what is your favorite part of being involved in the network

 

Meeting awesome women business owners and playing a part in advocating for them through my association with WIPP. 


As a law firm, how does McDonald Hopkins help federal contractors?

 

McDonald Hopkins Federal Government Contracting and Procurement Group helps federal contractors in numerous ways. I lead the group and am thrilled that we have the expertise and capacity to handle our clients’ contracting and business needs. We frequently help clients with corporate transactions including buying and selling their companies, succession planning, Novations, federal bid protests, size protests and NAICs code protests, SBA 8(a), WOSB, SDVOSB, HUBZone, WBE, MBE certification and appeals, contract review and negotiation, FAR compliance assistance, business ethics and EEO policies, requests for equitable adjustment and claims, suspension and debarment proceedings, contract disputes, SBA Mentor-Protégé agreements, joint ventures and teaming agreements, CPAR appeals, and contract disputes.

 

 

What are some common hurdles you see for federal contractors in your work? 

Common hurdles I see for federal contractors are trying to stay ahead of competition, access to capital for small businesses, and understanding SBA and federal acquisition regulations and compliance.

 

 

This month you’ll be hosting a WIPP Education Platform webinar on succession planning. Why are you passionate about that topic?

 

I have represented countless large and small women-owned businesses and other small businesses throughout my legal career. I have watched them put their life blood into their business to grow and build a legacy for their families and employees. While these business owners are technical experts in their fields, few businesses really have the time or key knowledge to plan the succession. 

 

Many women-owned businesses then end up simply closing up or selling for less than market value because they did not have a good plan in place. Being able to help business owners to plan and provide them good legal and practical advice fulfills me.

  

 

What is your biggest takeaway from WIPP advocacy actions?

 

My biggest takeaway from WIPP is never give up. Women can and do make a huge difference in shaping the policies and future of our nation. Take advantage of the wonderful benefits of your WIPP membership. 


Is there anything else you wish readers would know about WIPP?

 

The members of WIPP are so fortunate to have such top-notch leadership with Candace Waterman and her outstanding professional and very knowledgeable staff.


 

McDonald Hopkins logo

Learn more about Michelle and her team at McDonald Hopkins at https://mcdonaldhopkins.com.

Each month, WIPP highlights a member who has leveraged WIPP membership to grow their business, engage with elected officials, and/or elevate the mission of WIPP and the visibility of women-owned businesses.

Tags:  leadership  membership  spotlight 

Share |
Permalink
 

FAQ: What COVID-19 Relief Means to Women-Owned Businesses

Posted By Ann Sullivan, WIPP Chief Advocate, Wednesday, April 1, 2020
Updated: Friday, April 3, 2020

 

Please check WIPP.org/coronavirus for the latest business resources. The WIPP Advocacy Team has been breaking down this legislation on our weekly Monday webinars and we have written this FAQ to help the WIPP network. We will expand this FAQ as more questions and clarifications become necessary. Email questions to the ACE HelpDesk at membership@wipp.org.

 

Congress has passed three bills providing COVID-19 relief to individuals and businesses. 

  • The first, Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations (H.R. 6074), became law on March 6. 
  • The second, Families First Coronavirus Response Act (Families First) (H.R. 6201), became law on March 18.
  • The third bill, Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) (H.R. 748), became law on March 27. 
  • Future legislation will wait until Congress returns Monday, April 20. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said that the next coronavirus stimulus should include at least $760 billion over five years for infrastructure, including water projects, broadband and transportation—plus $10 billion for community health centers and more for housing and education. 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

I need funding. What loan programs are available for me right now?

As a result of the legislation, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has four options for funding relief in the wake of COVID-19.

 

My workforce has been affected. What are the new sick leave and family leave (FMLA) requirements for employers? 

Specifically listed in the Families First legislation, employers under 500 employees are required to offer two weeks of paid sick leave to employees who are sick from the coronavirus, taking care of someone who is sick with the virus or are providing childcare due to cancelled school/daycare – without fear of losing their jobs.

The bill applies to all employers and expands the definition of who is eligible for FMLA by adding employees who are unable to work because they are providing childcare due to closed schools/daycare centers. Requirements for employers include paying employees two-thirds pay for a little more than 10 weeks. This change is effective through December 31, 2020. Employers can get a 100% quarterly payroll tax credit to cover this expense.

Visit the Department of Labor’s FAQ for specific questions regarding the Families First legislation. 


What is the guidance for federal contractors? 

A March 20 memo to the Defense Industrial Base (DIB) caused massive issues for contractors. In order to stay in business, contractors have had no other choice other than to send their employees to work – sick or not, affecting 2.5 million workers and putting an even larger population at risk. 

Section 3610 of the CARES Act H.R. 748) solves this by telling agencies to pay their contractors who cannot come to work until this pandemic is over. Keep good records and talk to your contracting officer about this new law.



How will this affect my taxes? 

The IRS explains all of the changes and is continuously updating their site: https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus

 

 

 

Tags:  Advocacy  COVID-19  policy 

Share |
Permalink
 

Advocacy Update: Third COVID-19 Relief Bill

Posted By Elizabeth Sullivan, WIPP Advocacy Team, Thursday, March 26, 2020

The Senate passed the third bipartisan COVID-19 relief bill H.R. 748: Coronavirus aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act last night. The House is expected to vote on the legislation tomorrow. WIPP Members should pay attention to an important federal contracting provision and stay tuned for advocacy action steps. 


Legislation breakdowns from Committees:

Additional resources from the Advocacy Team:

Tags:  Advocacy  COVID-19  federal contracting  legislation 

Share |
Permalink
 
Page 2 of 9
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  >   >>   >| 
more Calendar

9/21/2020
FountainHead: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Panel Event (VIRTUAL)

9/29/2020 » 10/1/2020
WIPP Virtual Symposium on Cyber Resiliency

10/14/2020
WIPP Advocacy Update - October 2020

10/19/2020
WIPP Intersectionality Series

10/21/2020
WIPP Community Connections - October 2020

Featured Members
Jeanette Prenger (Hernandez)President & CEO, ECCO Select, North Kansas City, MO — September 2020 Member Spotlight
Tina PattersonPrincipal, Jade Solutions, Germantown, MD — August 2020 Member Spotlight

Privacy Policy / Disclaimer    |    © WIPP  |    888-488-WIPP

Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal