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News & Press: WIPP Policy Watch & Newsletters

WIPP In Action - February 2019

Wednesday, February 6, 2019  
Posted by: Laura Berry
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Plan Your Year with WIPP

The President gave us the State of the Union last night, and we are excited for a renewed call to bipartisanship. In addition, we will continue the celebration of the , many of whom wore white last night to honor suffrage, with a special reception in Washington, D.C. tonight.

 

, I’m here to tell you the state of WIPP is robust, relevant, and ready for the year ahead. Our 2019 will be a banner year as we take important steps to evolve and elevate our membership, programming, and events.

 

First and foremost, our advocacy programs are the waters that run deep through all of our work. If you haven’t already, please revisit . These are our guiding topics throughout the year, which we plan to bring to our regional strategic partners and members through activation trainings and call-to-action alerts throughout the year.

 

With our partners, the U.S. Small Business Administration and American Express, we are delighted to launch our 2019 slate of trainings, which will include online components this year. Look for our full calendar of events later this month.

 

We are excited about the launch of our WIPP Education Platform, which includes a series on the procurement landscape, building capacity, and managing wealth. The education and information provided includes the needs of not only our emerging business members, but also the advanced businesses who have been negotiating the nuances of long-term federal contracting.

 

The best way to understand and leverage the intersection of advocacy and education is to join us for the WIPP 2019 Business Leadership Conference: Changing the Game, held June 23 to 25 in Washington, D.C. In addition to networking, matchmaker meetings, and programming, we will have a legislative day with visits to Capitol Hill for attendees. Stay tuned for more information.

 

Most importantly, we are refocused on bringing value and visibility to our members. As we move through the year, we will be reaching out to ensure you know how to use and update your online profile; you have access to exclusive business and procurement opportunities; and you can connect with peers in our amazing community. Members will also have access to our organizational news first, including the launch of our early bird registration for the WIPP Business Leadership Conference.

 

If you haven’t already, . Please tell a friend about us and what we’re doing this year. We feel the energy and there is no turning back now!

 

- Candace Waterman, WIPP President & CEO

@CandaceWaterman

Starting a New Congress With A Shutdown


It’s kind of like rain on the 4th of July. After picnics and family gatherings, the highlight of the day is the fireworks. But a thunderstorm can quickly bring down the holiday celebrations. That’s what it felt like on January 3rd, when the new Congress was sworn in. The excitement, dampened by the “rain” of the shutdown, loomed over the festivities.

 

The shutdown rained on the excitement of new/continuing business anticipated by federal contractors and the consequences were substantial. According to , small firms nationally lost out on 6,875 contract actions a day, worth $301 million, during the shutdown. , federal contractors lost around $200 million per day during the shutdown.

 

Women contractors were also affected by the shutdown. According to Bloomberg Government, in FY2018 $768.8 million in federal contracts were awarded to women-owned small businesses. More than 38% of those contracts won by women were awarded by agencies impacted by the shutdown. These statistics are the direct costs, and the indirect costs are difficult to measure but felt by the women’s business community. Members struggled to keep their employees, meet payroll, and get important approvals from government agencies.

 

Interestingly, most WIPP members I heard from did not necessarily see this through a partisan lens. They saw it through a practical lens- that government shutdowns are not a way to resolve disagreements. Unlike the media, I didn’t hear anyone declare “victory,” because really no one won. While members disagreed about the resolution to border security/immigration policies that ushered in the shutdown, everyone expressed weariness over the budget tactics of the last five years.

 

– we communicated the risks shutdowns mean for women owned businesses, especially government contractors. We urged Congress to include making small business contractors whole, given the length and difficulty of the shutdown. Lastly, we urged the Congress to pass legislation that prevents government shutdowns from happening. Both Republican and Democratic bills would put the government on a continuing resolution if the Congress could not get regular appropriations over the finish line in a timely manner.

 

As we advocate on behalf of women entrepreneurs, we know to expect rain. But we are equally hopeful. More women than ever were elected to this new Congress. A new Congress means new or reinvigorated leadership. The enthusiasm for women’s engagement in policy has never been greater. Just like our members, women elected to Congress will press for a practical approach. It does not mean that partisanship will go away—that is the stuff of politics. But we feel that “agreeing to disagree” has a much better shot at becoming the standard by which policies are measured with 131 elected women.

 

If you have never taken the step of contacting your elected officials, visiting their offices or inviting them to come to your business, now is the time. The result will be empowering. Preventing future shutdowns requires constituent communications as well as organizations that represent you. Don’t know how to start? Go to or . The websites will direct you to your elected officials based on your zip code. The women’s business community and the economy need your voice.

 

The nicest thing about rain is that it always stops.

 

- Ann Sullivan, WIPP Chief Advocate

@AnnSullivanMSGI

 

50 Fastest Owned/Led

 

The Women Presidents’ Organization is conducting the annual search for the 50 Fastest Growing Women-Owned/Led Companies™, sponsored by Capital One Commercial Banking. This year marks the 12th annual competition to identify the 50 Fastest, ranked according to revenue growth, from 2014 to 2018.

 

! All applications need to be submitted by February 15, 2019.

Enterprising Women

 

Enterprising Women magazine, has announced the winners of the , an annual tribute to the world’s top women entrepreneurs. Honorees will be recognized Sunday, March 24 to Tuesday, March 26 at the Westin Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

 

Special congratulations to WIPP Champion Member Karen R. Jenkins of in Columbia, South Carolina for winning in the “over $2 million and up to $5 million in annual sales” category!

Bills That Mean Business

Members of Congress are considering bills that would address the recent 35-day government shutdown. Several bills have been introduced that would provide back pay for low-wage contract employees who were impacted during the shutdown.

 

Senator Tina Smith (D-Minn.) introduced , while similar bills were introduced in the House by Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.) with and Representative Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) with . The three Members of Congress discussed their efforts recently in a press conference and expressed hope that one of these bills will be included in a legislative package that keeps the government open beyond February 15, 2019.

 

Senators also looked to address ending government shutdowns permanently. Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) introduced the End Government Shutdowns Act () which would create an automatic continuing resolution (CR) for any regular appropriations bill not completed by the October 1 funding deadline.

 

On the other side of the aisle, Senator Mark Warner (D-Va.) introduced the Stop STUPIDITY (Shutdowns Transferring Unnecessary Pain and Inflicting Damage In The Coming Years) Act (). The Stop STUPIDITY Act would keep the government running in the case of a lapse in funding by automatically renewing government funding at the same levels as the previous fiscal year, with adjustments for inflation.

House Small Business Committee Members

Senate Small Business Committee

The House Small Business Committee Members for the 116th Congress (2019-2020) have been announced. Six of the 23 members of the Committee are women, with five Democrats and one Republican. Representative Nydia M. Velázquez (D-N.Y.) returns as Chair of the Committee. She was the first Latina to chair a full Congressional Committee when she was Chair in 2006.

 

The other Democrat Members include: Rep. Dwight Evans (D-Pa.) – Vice Chair; Rep. Abby Finkenauer (D-Iowa); Rep. Andy Kim (D-N.J.); Rep. Sharice Davids (D-Kan.); Rep. Jared Golden (D-Maine); Rep. Jason Crow (D-Colo.); Rep. Judy Chu (D-Calif.); Rep. Marc Veasey (D-Texas); Rep. Brad Schneider (D-Ill.); Rep. Adriano Espaillat (D-N.Y.); Rep. Antonio Delgado (D-N.Y.); and Rep. Chrissy Houlahan (D-Pa.).

 

House Republicans Representative Steve Chabot (R-Ohio), who was Chair of the Committee last session, to be Ranking Member. Other Members of the Committee include: Del. Amata Coleman Radewagen (R-American Samoa); Rep. Trent Kelly (R-Miss.); Rep. Troy Balderson (R-Ohio); Rep. Kevin Hern (R-Okla.); Rep. Jim Hagedorn (R-Minn.); Rep. Pete Stauber (R-Minn.); Rep. Tim Burchett (R-Tenn.); Rep. Ross Spano (R-Fla.); and Rep. John Joyce (R-Penn.). Six of the 10 Republican Members are freshmen, meaning this is their first term in Congress. The 10 Members represent seven different states and one U.S. territory.

 

SBA Office of Advocacy

Releases Report on Small Business GDP

The Small Business Administration (SBA) Office of Advocacy has from 1998-2014. The Office of Advocacy reported that while small business GDP rose 71.9 percent from 1998 to 2014, the small business share of GDP relative to large businesses declined from 48.0% in 1998 to 43.5% in 2014. The report also found that small businesses use payroll more efficiently than large businesses, creating $2.44 in GDP per payroll dollar in 2014 compared to $2.20 for large businesses.

 

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